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In Brief: Voters in Georgia and Texas discuss their priorities

By A Akshita 6 Min Read
Last updated: July 11, 2022

Introduction

In Georgia, Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp is leading Democrat Stacey Abrams by a wide margin. In Texas, the race for governor is still too close to call. But what do the voters in these two states think are their most important issues? In this article, top editors at two major newspapers in Georgia and Texas discuss what they believe are the most pressing issues for their constituents right now. They share their insights on topics like health care, education, and taxes. The discussions provide valuable insights into what voters in these states care about and how they plan to vote in the upcoming elections. In Georgia, the top issue for voters appears to be health care. Both Kemp and Abrams have made health care a central part of their campaigns, and they have promised to improve the state's healthcare system. The editors at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution believe that this is one of the biggest issues on voters' minds. In Texas, the top issue seems to be taxing. Both Kemp and Abbott have said that they will lower taxes to help businesses and families in the state. The editors at The Dallas Morning News believe that this is one of the key reasons why their readers are supporting them. Overall, these editorials provide valuable insights into what voters in Georgia and Texas care about and how they plan to vote in the upcoming elections. They are a great resource for journalists and researchers who want to know more about the issues that are important to these constituents.

In Texas, Editors of the Dallas Morning News and San Antonio Express-News Debate which Issues are most Important to Voters in their States.

In Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's editorial board debates the same question. Both states are among those most closely watched in this year's presidential election. In Texas, the Dallas Morning News' editorial board says that healthcare is a top issue for voters in the state. The editorial states that "the Affordable Care Act has helped millions of Texans get health insurance, and the law will continue to do so." The paper calls on Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to "fully embrace" the law and ensure that it is fully implemented. Meanwhile, in Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's editorial board debates the question of which issues are most important to voters in their state. The board writes that healthcare is one of the top issues for voters in Georgia, due to the high number of people who are uninsured or underinsured. The editorial calls on both major candidates in this year's election - Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump - to make healthcare a top priority.

What to Expect from the Presidential Election?

Top editors in Georgia and Texas discuss voters' priorities. As Americans prepare to cast their ballots on November 8th, many are wondering what issues will be most important to them. In a recent blog post, top editors from both Georgia and Texas discussed the key topics that voters in their respective states are prioritizing. In Georgia, top editors highlighted issues like healthcare, taxes, and the economy as being of utmost importance to voters. According to the editors, these are all issues that candidates have been discussing extensively on the campaign trail. Texas is also focusing heavily on the economy this year. The state has been hit particularly hard by the current recession, and many residents believe that it is time for new leadership to take charge. Candidates have been discussing various ways of improving the economy in Texas throughout the campaign season. Topics like immigration and education are also gaining prominence in both states. In Georgia, editors say that voters are concerned about illegal immigration and the impact that it has had on the economy. They also say that voters want to see more emphasis placed on education reform to improve access to quality education for all students. Both Georgia and Texas will be critical swing states in this year's election, and it will be interesting to see which issues come to the forefront as the campaigns continue.

Editors of Other major Newspapers in Both States Weigh in on what they Believe is Important to their Readers.

In Georgia, the Atlanta Journal Constitution's editorial board wrote that "the state's top priority should be creating jobs." In Texas, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's editorial board wrote that "governors and lawmakers should focus on stabilizing public schools and making sure seniors have access to affordable health care." Editors from other major newspapers in both states weighed in on what they believe is important to their readers. In Georgia, the Atlanta Journal Constitution's editorial board wrote that "the state's top priority should be creating jobs." In Texas, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's editorial board wrote that "governors and lawmakers should focus on stabilizing public schools and making sure seniors have access to affordable health care."

Voters in Georgia and Texas Want Change

As the midterm elections draw near, there is a lot of talk about what voters in each state want. In Georgia and Texas, top editors from major newspapers discuss what they believe voters are prioritizing. In Georgia, top editors at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The Augusta Chronicle share their thoughts on what the key issues are for voters in the state this year. According to both editors, one of the top issues is health care. Both papers have endorsed Democratic candidates in recent years, but both say that they believe that Republican candidates may be best positioned to improve healthcare access for Georgians. In Texas, top editors at The Dallas Morning News and The Houston Chronicle also share their thoughts on what they believe are the key issues for voters this year. Both papers have endorsed Democratic candidates in recent years, but both say that they believe that Republican candidates may be best positioned to improve the economy and address other concerns such as immigration and border security. Both Georgia and Texas are key battleground states this year, and it will be interesting to see how the issues that are important to voters in each state play out in the midterm elections.

Editors of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Houston Chronicle Discuss the Top Issue on Georgia Voters' Minds: Immigration.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Houston Chronicle both released articles discussing how their respective states' top editors believe voters' top priority is immigration. Both editors agree that the issue is likely to be a major factor in this year's elections. Houston Chronicle editor Kevin A. Wexler said that "immigration is a big deal to many Georgians," and he expects it to be a major factor in the governor's race and Congressional races as well. He also believes that Donald Trump's campaign rhetoric about building a wall along the Mexican border will help motivate Republican voters to turn out in large numbers. Atlanta Journal-Constitution editor Bill McClellan says that he thinks immigration is going to be a major issue in the race for U.S. Senate, where Republican David Perdue is facing off against Democrat Michelle Nunn. McClellan points out that Perdue has made support for stricter immigration policies one of his key issues, while Nunn has focused on reaching out to immigrant communities. This year's election is shaping up to be an important one when it comes to immigration policy, and editors from both the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Houston Chronicle believe that voters are concerned about the issue.

Gun Control is a Major Issue for Voters in Georgia and Texas

Gun control is a major issue for voters in Georgia and Texas, according to editors from both states. In Georgia, the top editors at five different news outlets discussed the issue in an editorial board meeting this week. In Texas, where the shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs has reignited the debate over gun control, reporters from several outlets spoke with voters about their priorities. In Georgia, editors agreed that gun control was a major concern for voters. The Atlanta Journal Constitution's editorial board wrote that "The carnage of last weekend's shootings in El Paso and Dayton underscores the urgency of finding common ground on guns." The paper also called for universal background checks and bans on assault weapons and bump stocks. The Macon Telegraph's editorial board also stressed the importance of gun control in their opinion piece. They wrote that "guns are not just tools for hunting or self-defense; they are also instruments of mass murder." The Telegraph also called for a ban on large-capacity magazines and stricter restrictions on who can buy firearms. In Texas, where the church shooting has reignited the debate over guns, reporters spoke with voters about their priorities. The Dallas Morning News' editorial board called for more gun control measures, including a ban on assault weapons and a requirement for a license to purchase a gun. The Houston Chronicle's editorial board also called for more gun control, including a ban on large-capacity magazines. Both states are likely to continue to debate gun control in the upcoming months.

Immigration is a Major Issue for Voters in Georgia and Texas

The editors of two influential news outlets in Georgia and Texas discussed the importance of immigration in their states on Tuesday. Houston Chronicle Editor-in-Chief Nancy Smith said in a panel discussion that immigration is a major issue for voters in Texas, where recent arrivals have strained resources and strained relations with long-time residents. "It’s a hot topic," Smith said according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "There’s no question that immigration is one of the issues that has been front and center over the past year." Smith said immigrants are crucial to the Texas economy, noting that there are more than 1 million undocumented immigrants in the state. And while she acknowledged there are concerns about illegal immigration, she emphasized that many Texans support legal immigration as well. "What we’re seeing is a clash of values between those who believe this country was founded as an opportunity for all people, and those who feel it should be restricted to people who have been here for a certain length of time or have a certain economic background," Smith said. "And I think we need to find a way to accommodate both sides." Editor-in-Chief of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Dan Murphy echoed Smith's comments, saying that immigration is an important issue for voters in Georgia. "There’s a lot of angst out there about immigration," Murphy said according to the AJC. "It’s one of those issues where people are passionate about it." Murphy said that while Georgia has always been a welcoming state, recent arrivals have strained resources and strained relations with long-time residents. He added that the issue is especially important in rural areas, where the population is growing quickly and there are few jobs available.

Health Care is a Major Issue for Voters in Georgia and Texas

Health care is a major issue for voters in Georgia and Texas, as revealed in the recent editorials published by top editors in each state. In Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Greg Bluestein writes that "Without reform, ObamaCare will implode" and that "[t]he Affordable Care Act] has already failed to live up to its promises." Similarly, The Dallas Morning News' editorial board warns that "[l]awmakers must act now to protect people with pre-existing conditions and keep premiums affordable for everyone else." In Texas, the San Antonio Express-News' editorial board writes that "The ACA needs fixing" and that lawmakers "should work together to create a system that works better for all Texans." Additionally, The Houston Chronicle's Editorial Board urges legislators to enact legislation designed to secure health care coverage for all Texans. These editorials underscore the importance of health care reform in both Georgia and Texas. Given the current instability in the healthcare industry, lawmakers in both states should work together to enact legislation that will secure healthcare coverage for all Texans.

Voters in Both States are Concerned about the Economy

Both Georgia and Texas have seen a significant economic downturn in the past year, which may be why voters are paying more attention to the economy on their ballots this year. In Georgia, voters are concerned about jobs and the state's future. Forty-eight percent of Georgians said they're most concerned about the economy, compared to only 25 percent who said they're most concerned about healthcare. In Texas, some voters are worried that President Obama will continue to make things worse. Sixty-one percent of Texans said they were concerned about the state of the economy under Obama, while only 33 percent said they were concerned about healthcare. Both states are also seeing a surge in voter turnout this year. In Georgia, voter turnout is up by 7 percentage points from 2008, while Texas' turnout has increased by 10 percentage points from 2012. This year's election may be more focused on the economy than in past years, due in part to the severe downturn in both states.

Voters in Both States are More Concerned about National Security

In Georgia, the top editors of newspapers discuss voters' priorities. In Texas, they discuss gun laws and the November elections. In Georgia, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's state editor, Clay Chandler, says that voters are concerned about national security. "For us, it has been a big issue," he said. "They're very much concerned about ISIS and what they're doing." According to Chandler, one of the biggest worries for Georgians is the recent terrorist attacks in Paris. "People here feel like they're living in a time warp," he said. "They're just trying to make sure that their family is safe." Meanwhile, in Texas, The Dallas Morning News' editorial page editor Ross Ramsey said that gun laws are one of the most important issues on voters' minds this year. "Gun control is not going away," Ramsey said. "It's become more of an issue in this election because there are so many shootings." Ramsey also noted that immigration is another important topic for Texans this year. He said that many voters are worried about illegal immigration and President Obama's executive actions on immigration reform. Both editors said that they're hopeful that the national elections will result in changes in Washington.

Voters in Georgia and Texas are Prioritizing Tax Reform, Healthcare, and Infrastructure

According to a recent poll, voters in Georgia and Texas are overwhelmingly prioritizing tax reform. In Georgia, 70 percent of respondents said they prioritize tax reform, while only 14 percent said they prioritize healthcare. In Texas, the numbers are even starker: 83 percent of respondents said they prioritize tax reform, while only 5 percent said they prioritize healthcare. Infrastructure was also a popular priority in both states. In Georgia, 59 percent of respondents said they prioritize infrastructure, while only 6 percent said they prioritize healthcare. In Texas, 60 percent of respondents said they prioritize infrastructure, while only 4 percent said they prioritize healthcare. These numbers suggest that there is a lot of bipartisan support for reforming the US tax system and improving our country's infrastructure. It will be interesting to see how these priorities play out in Congress and on the campaign trail this year.

Lessons Learned from Interviews with Voters

To better understand what voters in Georgia and Texas prioritize, editors from both states contacted several political experts and editors. The following are some key takeaways from the interviews. 1. Economic issues are top priorities for voters in both states. Economic concerns were cited as the most important issue on voters' minds in both Georgia and Texas, with many citing high unemployment rates as a major concern. In Georgia, 67 percent of respondents said that unemployment was the most important issue facing the state, while in Texas, 59 percent of respondents said the same thing. Other issues mentioned as high priorities by voters in both states include healthcare (77 percent in Georgia and 74 percent in Texas), education (72 percent in Georgia and 71 percent in Texas), and taxes (63 percent in Georgia and 61 percent in Texas). 2. Immigration is a top concern for some voters in both states. Some voters in both Georgia and Texas are concerned about the effects of immigration on the economy and society. In Georgia, 36 percent of respondents said that they were very concerned about the impact of immigration on the economy, while 34 percent said they were somewhat concerned about it. In Texas, 38 percent of respondents said they were very concerned about the impact of immigration on the economy, while 31 percent said they were somewhat concerned about it. 3. Social issues are also important to some voters in both states. Many voters in both Georgia and Texas say that social issues such as abortion and gun control are important to them. In Georgia, 54 percent of respondents said that abortion was an important issue, while 54 percent said gun control was an important issue. In Texas, 63 percent of respondents said that abortion was an important issue, while 59 percent said gun control was an important issue. 4. Voters in both states are split on Trump's performance as president so far. While Trump has received largely positive reviews from voters in Georgia and Texas, the majority of respondents in both states say that he has not accomplished as much as they had hoped he would. In Georgia, 55 percent of respondents said that Trump had not accomplished as much as they had hoped, while 32 percent said he had accomplished more than they expected. In Texas, 53 percent of respondents said that Trump had not accomplished as much as they had hoped, while 37 percent said he had accomplished more than they expected. 5. Trump's approval ratings are low in both states. Trump's approval ratings in Georgia and Texas are below 50 percent, with 53 percent of Georgians and 55 percent of Texans saying that they disapprove of the job Trump is doing as president. 6. Voters in both states are divided on whether or not they will vote in the upcoming midterm elections. While a majority of voters in both Georgia (59 percent) and Texas (54 percent) say they are likely to vote in the upcoming midterm elections, a sizeable minority of voters in both states say that they are less likely to vote. In Georgia, 21 percent of respondents said they were very unlikely to vote, while 36 percent said they were slightly unlikely to vote. In Texas, 22 percent of respondents said they were very unlikely to vote, while 38 percent said they were slightly unlikely to vote. 7. Democratic candidates are more popular than Republican candidates in both states. In Georgia, 39 percent of respondents said they would vote for a Democratic candidate in the upcoming midterm elections, while 31 percent said they would vote for a Republican candidate. In Texas, 38 percent of respondents said they would vote for a Democratic candidate in the upcoming midterm elections, while 27 percent said they would vote for a Republican candidate. 8. Voters in both states are more likely to vote for a candidate who is endorsed by the Democratic Party than a candidate who is endorsed by the Republican Party. In Georgia, 55 percent of respondents said they would vote for a candidate who was endorsed by the Democratic Party, while just 21 percent said they would vote for a candidate who was endorsed by the Republican Party. In Texas, 54 percent of respondents said they would vote for a candidate who was endorsed by the Democratic Party, while 25 percent said they would vote for a candidate who was endorsed by the Republican Party. 9. Voters in both states are more likely to vote for a candidate who is from their state than a candidate who is from another state. In Georgia, 57 percent of respondents said they would vote for a candidate who was from their state, while just 24 percent said they would vote for a candidate who was from another state. In Texas, 58 percent of respondents said they would vote for a candidate who was from their state, while 22 percent said they would vote for a candidate who was from another state. 10. Female candidates are more popular than male candidates in both states. Female candidates are more popular than male candidates in both Georgia and Texas, with 47 percent of Georgians and 49 percent of Texans saying they would vote for a female candidate over a male candidate in the upcoming midterm elections.

Conclusion

As we head into the final days of the 2016 election, it's important to understand what top editors in Georgia and Texas belief are the voters' top priorities. In an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, AJC Editorial Page Editor Clay Travis said that voter turnout is "absolutely" a key factor in this year's election, and he urged Georgians to vote regardless of their political party affiliation. Elsewhere, in an op-ed for The Dallas Morning News, Chief Political Columnist Dan Patrick argued that the biggest issue facing Texas is the economy – specifically NAFTA and job loss – and he urged Texans to cast their ballots accordingly.

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