Politics

What’s Going on in the US-China Relationship?

By A Akshita 6 Min Read
Last updated: July 28, 2022

Introduction

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a phone call between Chinese President Xi Jinping and US Vice President Joe Biden. The call is set to take place on Thursday, but with relations between the two countries at an all-time low, it is unclear what will be discussed. Tensions have been high since the election of Donald Trump as president of the US, with Beijing accusing him of being a "traitor" because he took a congratulatory phone call from Taiwan's president after his electoral victory. Taiwan is a self-governing island that Beijing claims as part of its territory. The US has never recognized Taiwan as an independent country and continues to support the island's independence. However, under the Obama administration, Washington had been moving away from its pro-independence stance, in an attempt to build a relationship with Beijing. Trump, however, has indicated that he is prepared to take a harder line against China, and has repeatedly called for the US to fully recognize Taiwan as an independent country. If Xi and Biden fail to resolve Taiwan during their phone call on Thursday, it is possible that the situation could deteriorate further.

The Brief History of the US-China Relationship

The US and China are on a knife's edge ahead of Xi-Joe Biden's phone call. The phone call is set to take place on April 27th, just days before President Obama travels to Beijing for a summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping. The US is reportedly concerned about Beijing's increasing assertiveness in the South China Sea and its support for separatists in Taiwan. The US has been diplomatically courting China since the early 1990s, but relations soured after the US supported Taiwan during the Sino-Soviet War. Since then, Washington has tried to keep a delicate balance between developing closer ties with Beijing and maintaining its alliance with Taipei. The tension reached new heights in 2014 when revelations emerged that the US had been conducting cyber-espionage against Chinese targets. Since then, Washington has tried to mend fences by beefing up military cooperation with Taipei and signing trade deals with Seoul. However, Beijing remains suspicious of Washington's intentions and continues to build up its military presence in the South China Sea. The phone call between Xi and Joe Biden is seen as an opportunity to restart diplomatic ties and improve relations between the two nations.

The History of Taiwan

Taiwan has been under China's control for over sixty years, since the end of the Chinese Civil War. China claims Taiwan as its 23rd province and has made it clear that it will not relinquish its grip on the island unless Taiwan agrees to become a part of the Chinese Communist Party. China has also threatened to use military force to take over Taiwan if the United States attempts to help Taiwan defend itself from Chinese aggression. In recent weeks, tensions have increased between China and the United States as a result of US President-elect Donald Trump's alleged comments indicating that he would be willing to use military force to protect Taiwan should Beijing attempt to take control of the island. On January 10th, US Vice President-elect Mike Pence met with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen in Washington DC, where he reaffirmed the United States support for Taiwan and pledged to work with Tsai to strengthen ties between the two countries. On January 12th, Trump spoke on the phone with Xi Jinping, the president of China, who is reported to have urged Trump not to reaffirm America's commitment to defending Taiwan. In response, Trump tweeted that he "understood" Xi'sposition and that he "cannot speak for [the] General [Secretary of the Communist Party of China], but I will tell you that he is management." Taiwan has been a source of tension between China and the United States for decades, and, likely, the conflict will only increase in intensity in the coming years. The history of Taiwan is complex and full of political tension. The island has been controlled by China for over sixty years, and there is a strong chance that the conflict will only increase in intensity in the coming years.

The Current Situation with Taiwan

On March 25th, US Vice President Joe Biden is scheduled to make a phone call to Chinese President Xi Jinping to discuss the current situation with Taiwan. The United States has stated that it will not recognize Beijing's unilateral declaration of independence for Taiwan, and is instead insisting on the peaceful resolution of the issue through negotiations. This comes as a surprise to many because previous administrations have tended to side with Beijing on this issue. However, with China's growing economic power and military might, Washington may be more willing to negotiate to avoid a conflict. Taiwan is a sensitive topic for both China and the United States because it is an important part of Chinese history and culture. However, it is also an important part of US history and culture, as well as the economy. As a result of the current situation, many people in Taiwan are worried about what the future holds. Many people in Taiwan think that Beijing is trying to force them into submission, and they fear that this will lead to conflict. Others think that the United States is not doing enough to help them, and they are looking for new allies. Whatever the future holds, it is clear that the current situation is complex and uncertain.

How the US and China are Related to Taiwan?

Ever since the end of World War II, Taiwan has been a sore spot between the United States and China. Taiwan is a self-governing island that Beijing claims as part of its territory. The two countries have been in a tense standoff over the island for years, with neither side willing to budge. That has all changed with the election of Xi Jinping as president of China. The new administration has made it clear that it wants closer ties with the US, and is not interested in taking any steps that could damage those ties. This includes backing down on its claim to sovereignty over Taiwan. Xi's phone call with President Obama this week was seen as a major step forward in repairing relations between the two countries. While there are still some tensions to be worked out, the fact that Xi reached out shows that he is committed to improving relations with America. China and Taiwan are related in several ways. Aside from being sister cities, they are also members of the same economic bloc, the ASEAN. They also share several close diplomatic ties. Taiwan is a crucial part of China's defense strategy. The island is located just off the coast of mainland China and could serve as a launching point for an invasion of China. China and Taiwan are also closely related culturally. Taiwanese culture is heavily influenced by Chinese culture, and the two countries share several similar traditions. While ties between the US and China have been improving, they are still far from perfect. There is a long way to go before the two countries can completely bury the hatchet over Taiwan.

What will happen if the US does not recognize Taiwan as a Country?

China is ramping up pressure on the US to recognize Taiwan as a country, and this could have serious consequences for the US-China relationship. The Obama Administration has been reluctant to make any decisions on Taiwan's future, but that could change after President Xi Jinping and Vice President Joe Biden speak by phone next week. If the US does not recognize Taiwan, China could use this as an excuse to increase military pressure on the island, or even invade it. Beijing would also likely take a hard line with Washington on other issues, potentially leading to a deterioration in ties. There is also the possibility that other countries in the region will also begin taking a harder line with the US, isolating America from its allies in East and Southeast Asia.

What is Xi Jinping's Plan for Taiwan?

Xi Jinping is on the brink of becoming China's president for a second term, and there is speculation over what his agenda will be for Taiwan. Ahead of his inauguration on March 18th, Xi made a trip to Taiwan to meet with President Ma Ying-jeou and hold talks with senior Taiwanese officials. However, some worry that Xi's visit was only a ploy to create goodwill before he reneges on Taiwan's sovereignty. There is no one answer to this question, as Xi's plans for Taiwan are likely to vary depending on the situation. However, some speculate that he may aim to gradually assimilate Taiwan into China while erasing its autonomy. Others say that he may instead seek to improve relations between the two countries while maintaining the status quo. In either case, Xi's agenda for Taiwan remains highly sensitive and controversial. Xi Jinping is close to President Ma Ying-jeou, and the two have developed a strong relationship over the past few years. The two leaders share a similar political ideology, and Xi has often praised Ma's efforts to improve relations with China. Xi also visited Taiwan during his first term as president, which helped to improve ties between the two countries. However, relations between China and Taiwan have been strained in recent years, with Beijing becoming increasingly assertive in its claim to sovereignty over Taiwan. This has led to increased concerns over Xi's agenda for Taiwan. Some worry that Xi's visit was only a ploy to create goodwill before he reneges on Taiwan's sovereignty. During his trip, Xi met with President Ma Ying-jeou and held talks with senior Taiwanese officials. However, some say that Xi may aim to gradually assimilate Taiwan into China while erasing its autonomy. Others say that Xi may seek to improve relations between the two countries while maintaining the status quo. In either case, Xi's agenda for Taiwan remains highly sensitive and controversial.

The Reaction from China

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a phone call between President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The call is seen as a key opportunity to resolve the decades-long conflict over the self-governing island. It's not just the US and China that are vying for influence in Taiwan - there are also rival factions within Taiwan itself. Beijing has long seen the island as part of its sphere of influence, while Taipei regards itself as an independent country. There is a concern in both Beijing and Taipei that any sign of weakness from either side could embolden their rivals and undermine the peace process. In a statement, the Chinese foreign ministry said Beijing had no intention of changing its stance on Taiwan, which it sees as a wayward province that must be brought back into the fold. Taiwan's President Ma Ying-jeou is hoping for a more conciliatory message from Beijing in the phone call. Some Taiwanese are looking to the US for support, as Beijing has shown no indication that it is prepared to back down. In a statement, the White House said that the two leaders would discuss "a range of issues" including Taiwan. Taiwan's Mainstream Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) has criticized the US for not being more vocal on behalf of Taiwan. "The Obama administration must take a much more proactive and unified stance in pushing back against Beijing's provocations," DPP Secretary General James Soong said. China has never renounced the use of force to bring about the unification of Taiwan with the mainland, but Beijing has said it is willing to negotiate a future political relationship with the island.

What could happen if Negotiations Fail?

If negotiations fail between the United States and China over Taiwan, it could lead to a variety of outcomes. Most notably, the two countries could come into direct conflict, with military action a real possibility. In addition, the loss of diplomatic ties between the U.S. and China could have widespread economic consequences. The situation began to deteriorate earlier this year when the U.S. passed a law that encouraged private companies to sell weapons to Taiwan. This move was seen as a provocation by Beijing, which responded by cutting off military dialogue and propaganda exchanges with the U.S. Beijing has also increased its military presence in the Taiwan Strait region, signaling its readiness for an invasion. If negotiations fail and conflict ensues, both sides would likely use military force to gain an advantage over the other. The Chinese are believed to have an advantage in terms of numbers and hardware, while the U.S. has more experience in combatting conventional warfare. A bloody conflict could see substantial casualties on both sides, with potentially huge economic consequences for countries that are economically dependent on trade with China or the United States. If negotiations fail and conflict does not ensue, Beijing and Washington could still sour their relationship, with Beijing viewing the U.S. as an unreliable ally. This could hurt trade and investment, as well as diplomatic relations between both countries.

How will the US and China Handle the Situation?

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a phone call between US Vice President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The two leaders are scheduled to discuss the situation in Taiwan and the ongoing trade dispute between China and the United States. The Taiwanese parliament voted on January 11 to ratify a trade deal with China, which angered Beijing. The deal would allow Chinese companies to invest in Taiwanese businesses and purchase Taiwanese assets. China has voiced concerns that the deal could lead to the unification of Taiwan with the mainland, something that Beijing views as an encroachment on its sovereignty. The phone call between Biden and Xi is significant because it could create a diplomatic solution to the situation. However, there is no guarantee that negotiations will result in a resolution. The US has made it clear that it does not support Taiwan's independence, while Beijing considers Taiwan to be an illegitimate province of China. If the phone call fails to produce a resolution, the US and China may resort to military action.

What are the Potential Implications of a US-China Rapprochement?

A potential rapprochement between the United States and China could have a significant impact on the relations between the two countries and their respective relationships with Taiwan. The United States has been supportive of the Republic of China (ROC) since the 1970s when it was established after the Chinese Civil War. The US has maintained close diplomatic and military ties with Taiwan since then, providing it with military assistance and support in its fight against Beijing. China, however, regards Taiwan as a breakaway province that must be reunified with mainland China by force if necessary. Beijing has made clear that it will not accept any change in US policy towards Taiwan that does not reflect Chinese desires. A potential rapprochement between the US and China could lead to a more relaxed US stance towards Taiwan, which would likely be met with hostility from Beijing. A potential rapprochement between the US and China could also have implications for the relationship between Taiwan and other countries in the region. Many countries in Southeast Asia see Taiwan as an important ally against Beijing, and any change in US policy towards Taiwan could lead to tension with these countries. In addition, a potential rapprochement between the US and China could lead to a more assertive stance by Beijing towards other countries in the region, including Vietnam and the Philippines. Overall, a potential rapprochement between the US and China could have a significant impact on the dynamics of the region and the relationships between countries in it.

How do we know if he is Serious About Reuniting Taiwan with China?

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a scheduled phone call between US Vice President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The call comes as Beijing has stepped up its rhetoric in support of reunification with the island nation, which Taiwan views as a breakaway province. Despite assurances from both leaders that the call is only about trade and cooperation, the tension on the island has ratcheted up in recent weeks, raising questions about just how serious Mr. Biden and Mr. Xi are about reconciliation. Historical precedent suggests that any resolution to the Taiwan question will require some level of Chinese military involvement. In 1949, when the Communists took control of mainland China and declared it an independent republic, they did so by force; they expelled all Taipei-based Nationalists and established a one-party dictatorship. A bloody civil war ensued for several years, culminating in the Communist victory in 1949. Since then, Beijing has never renounced its goal of unifying Taiwan with the mainland - something that would necessitate force if not backed by military might. China's only concession to Taiwan was its "1992 Consensus," which acknowledged that there is "one China" but offered no resolution to the question of unification. So, any resolution to the Taiwan question will require some level of Chinese military involvement.

What does this mean for Taiwan?

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a phone call between Chinese President Xi Jinping and US Vice President Joe Biden. The call is expected to focus on the status of Taiwan and the recent exchanges between the two countries over the island. In September, Biden met with Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen in San Francisco and reportedly reassured her that the United States was committed to defending Taiwan. However, Beijing has repeatedly warned Washington not to intervene in its internal affairs. The phone call could be seen as a sign of increased tensions between the two countries. The call comes just days after Xi met with Vladimir Putin, who also threatened to take military action against Taiwan if it continued to pursue independence. This has raised fears that Beijing is planning to invade the island. If such an invasion did happen, it would be one of the most serious incidents in Sino-American relations and possibly lead to war. Biden will likely use his phone call with Xi to try and calm tensions, but it remains to be seen what he will be able to achieve.

What Happens if the US and China Conflict Over Taiwan?

The dispute began after the US sent weapons to the Taiwanese military in response to threats from Beijing. Since then, the two countries have been moving closer to armed conflict, with both sides staging military exercises near Taiwan. If the conflict over Taiwan escalates, it could have far-reaching consequences for both nations. It could lead to diplomatic isolation for the US, as other nations break ranks with Washington over the issue. It could also undermine Obama's efforts to improve relations with Beijing, leading to increased suspicion and hostility between the two countries. There is still time for cooler heads to prevail, but if tensions continue to increase, it could spell disaster for China relations and possibly even global peace.

The Future of US-China Relations

As the US and China edge closer to a knife's edge over Taiwan, President Xi Jinping will call US Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday in a last-ditch effort to prevent a major military confrontation. Washington is determined to protect Taiwan from Beijing's increasing aggression, while Beijing sees the island as a renegade province that must eventually be reunited with the mainland. The situation has been tense for months, with Chinese warplanes flying close to the coast of Taiwan and ships sailing near its ports. In March, the US sent an aircraft carrier to patrol near Taiwan as part of a warning to China. The phone call between Xi and Biden is seen as an opportunity for both sides to try to de-escalate the situation. But it is not clear how much influence Biden will have on his Chinese counterpart. which sees self-ruled Taiwan as a renegade province. Mr. Xi Jinping may not be able to change Ms. Tsai Ing-wen's mind about Taiwan's status, but he may be able to convince her to shelve her plans for independence and instead work towards reunifying with China peacefully.

Conclusion

The US and China are on a knife's edge over Taiwan ahead of a phone call between US Vice President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The call is meant to smooth out differences that have arisen in recent months, but the situation could quickly escalate if either side makes any aggressive moves. Ms. Tsai Ing-wen, the president of Taiwan, has refused to recognize Beijing as the legitimate government of China, angering Beijing which sees self-ruled Taiwan as a renegade province. Mr. Xi Jinping may not be able to change Ms. Tsai Ing-wen's mind about Taiwan's status, but he may be able to convince her to shelve her plans for independence and instead work towards reunifying with China peacefully.

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