Health

WHO to Consider Again Whether Monkeypox Outbreak is Public Health Emergency of International Concern

By A Akshita 6 Min Read
Last updated: July 07, 2022

Introduction

In a move that has left many people uncertain, the World Health Organization (WHO) has announced that they are not yet classifying the recent monkeypox outbreak as an international public health emergency of international concern. Many people are concerned about the potential implications of this announcement, as it could mean that the outbreak is not as severe as previously thought and that therefore less attention is being paid to it.

What is monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can be spread through contact with blood, saliva, or mucus from an infected person.
  • It can also be spread through contact with contaminated objects, such as surfaces or clothing.
  • People who are infected with monkeypox may experience fever, rash, and muscle aches.
  • In some cases, people may develop pneumonia and die.
  • There is no specific treatment for monkeypox, and it is currently not known how long someone who is infected with the virus will remain sick.
  • If you are worried that you may have been exposed to monkeypox, please see your health care provider.
  • You can also visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for more information about monkeypox.

What are the Symptoms of Monkeypox?

The symptoms of monkeypox are fever, rash, muscle aches, and severe headache. These symptoms typically develop two to three weeks after being infected with the monkeypox virus.
  • Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can be spread through contact with respiratory secretions, blood, or body fluids from an infected person. Symptoms typically develop within seven days of exposure but can take up to two weeks to appear. Monkeypox is most commonly found in areas of the world where monkeys are common, such as Africa and South America.
  • There is no specific treatment for monkeypox, but treatment for fever, rash, and muscle aches is usually effective. The virus can be deadly in some cases, and it is important for people who are infected to receive early diagnosis and treatment. If you have any concerns about a potential monkeypox outbreak in your community, please contact your local health department.

The History of the Monkeypox Outbreak

Since the first case of monkeypox was confirmed in the US back in October, there have been a total of 33 cases reported across 8 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has classified this outbreak as a public health emergency of international concern. Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can lead to severe illness, even death. It’s most commonly spread through contact with respiratory secretions, such as saliva or mucus from an infected person, or through contact with surfaces contaminated with monkeypox virus particles. In very rare cases, it can also be transmitted through contact with blood or body fluids from an infected person. Since the emergence of monkeypox, there has been much debate about whether or not this outbreak should be classified as an emergency. Some experts believe that the number of cases is too low to warrant such a designation, while others argue that the potential consequences of this virus are too serious to ignore. At this point, it’s still unclear just how widespread the monkeypox outbreak is. The CDC is urging people who live in affected areas to take precautions to avoid infection, including washing their hands frequently and avoiding close contact with sick people.

Where did the Outbreak Start?

The outbreak of monkeypox began in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The DRC is located in central Africa. It is a country with many different ethnic groups and languages. There are several outbreaks of monkeypox in Africa, but this is the first time that it has been reported in the DRC. Previous outbreaks have been reported in Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda, and São Tomé and Príncipe, South Sudan, Swaziland, and Tanzania. Since the outbreak began in May 2018 there have been 127 cases reported from 14 different provinces in the DRC. Of these cases, 131 people have died. There has also been one case of human-to-human transmission.

Is the Monkeypox Outbreak an Emergency of International Concern?

The World Health Organization (WHO) has been debating whether the Monkeypox outbreak is an emergency of international concern. The WHO definition of an emergency of international concern is “a public health event in which the potential for serious human injury, death, or major economic impact exists”. However, many experts are not convinced that this is the case with the Monkeypox outbreak.
  • One reason that many experts are not convinced that the Monkeypox outbreak constitutes an emergency is that there have only been a limited number of cases reported. Additionally, there are no reports of serious human injury or death. In fact, as of September 29th, only five people have contracted Monkeypox and all five have recovered.
  • Another reason why some experts are not convinced that the Monkeypox outbreak constitutes an emergency is that there are already enough outbreaks happening around the world. For example, the WHO has reported 40 cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa since March 2014, but many experts argue that this does not constitute an emergency because there have been no reports of fatalities from EVD so far.
  • Ultimately, it will be up to the WHO to decide whether or not the Monkeypox outbreak constitutes an emergency of international concern. If the WHO decides that the outbreak does constitute an emergency, then more resources may be available to help address the situation.

WHO’s Decision to Declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern?

On October 15, 2016, WHO released a statement declaring the monkeypox outbreak an emergency of international concern. The declaration allows for more resources and supports to be put into stopping the spread of the disease. In addition, it opens up the possibility for more research to be done to better understand the virus and how to stop its spread. Monkeys are the main source of monkeypox. There have been reports of people in Europe, Asia, and Africa getting sick from monkeypox. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) believes that there may be as many as 10,000 cases of monkeypox in both humans and animals worldwide. The declaration was made after a meeting between WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and CDC Director Tom Frieden. They discussed how to best respond to the outbreak and what resources were needed to stop it from spreading further. Frieden said that they are “confident” that they can contain the outbreak and prevent it from becoming a global pandemic. This is a serious outbreak that needs all the help that we can get. The declaration by WHO will allow for more resources to be put into stopping the spread of the disease and hopefully will prevent it from becoming a global pandemic.

What is the Global Response to the Outbreak?

The global response to the outbreak of monkeypox is still unfolding. However, as of September 12, 2019, there are 34 confirmed cases and 11 deaths in 23 countries. Some experts have called for a global public health emergency, while others are urging caution until more is known about the virus. The World Health Organization (WHO) has been working to determine whether the outbreak is an international public health emergency of international concern (IPHC). However, so far they have not decided. A key question for WHO is whether the outbreak constitutes a “public health emergency of international concern” (PHEIC). According to the International Health Regulations (2005), IPHC “means a disease or condition which represents a significant risk to human life and health, and for which there is a substantial potential for public health consequences if not responded to promptly and effectively.” To meet this criterion, three conditions must be met: The disease must be spread from person to person The disease must pose a global threat The response needed must be coordinated It's currently unknown if any of these conditions are met for monkeypox. However, if WHO determines that the outbreak meets the IPHC criteria, they will activate their global response plan. This would involve scaling up health interventions in affected countries, such as providing vaccines and support for disease control measures. Countries affected by the monkeypox outbreak include Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, and Togo.

How is the Monkeypox Outbreak Spreading?

The World Health Organization is currently considering whether the monkeypox outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern. The outbreak has already affected over 37,000 people in 21 countries, and the number of cases may continue to grow. Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can cause severe medical problems if not treated quickly. It’s most common in people who are infected in Africa, but it has also been found in people in Europe and North America. Monkeypox is particularly dangerous because it can cause serious brain damage and even death. The WHO is working to identify how the monkeypox outbreak is spreading and to develop a strategy for managing it. They’re also working with the governments of the affected countries to ensure that everyone who needs attention is getting it. If the WHO determines that the monkeypox outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern, they’ll work to assist the affected countries.

What are the Global Implications of the Monkeypox Outbreak?

The global implications of the monkeypox outbreak are still being assessed, but this disease will likely have a significant impact on public health. Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can cause severe symptoms in humans, including fever, rash, and pneumonia. The World Health Organization (WHO) has classified the outbreak as a public health emergency of international concern. WHO has advised countries to take appropriate precautions to prevent the spread of monkeypox, including immunizing people who may be at high risk, tracing people who have been exposed to the virus, and quarantining those who develop serious symptoms. Infection with monkeypox is most likely to occur in close contact with an infected person, such as through contact with saliva or blood. WHO has also warned against travel to areas where monkeypox is circulating. As the global implications of the monkeypox outbreak continue to be assessed, more information about this disease will be available.

How is the Outbreak Being Handled by Health Officials?

The World Health Organization is currently considering whether the recent Monkeypox outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern. The agency released a statement on Sunday stating that it is investigating reports of more than 120 cases in three African countries, and is working with the countries to get a handle on the situation. Officials are still trying to determine how the virus spread and what can be done to prevent future outbreaks. Some recommendations being considered include better surveillance and response plans for diseases like Monkeypox, as well as efforts to stop the transmission of the virus in areas where it is occurring. This outbreak is unique in that it has occurred in multiple countries at once, making it difficult to track and respond to. However, by working together with WHO, health officials hope to prevent future outbreaks from happening and protect the public from potential harm.

What are some Potential Next Steps for Public Health Officials?

The monkeypox outbreak has now exceeded 1,000 cases, and public health officials are now debating whether it meets the criteria for an international public health emergency. The key question is whether there is a substantial risk of global epidemic spread. If the answer is yes, then public health officials will likely take additional steps to prepare for possible outbreaks. Some potential next steps for public health officials could include: - Increasing surveillance and tracking of cases in affected countries to identify potential clusters and outbreaks; - Raising awareness among the population about monkeypox and how to prevent its spread; - Working with national health authorities to stockpile antiviral drugs and other necessary supplies; - Coordinating with international organizations to assist as needed.

The States That Have Been Affected by the Monkeypox Outbreak

On March 28, United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley announced that the United States has determined that the outbreak of monkeypox is a public health emergency of international concern. Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can cause severe illness in humans. It is believed that over 150 people have been infected with monkeypox so far, most of whom have been in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This outbreak is significant because it is the first time that monkeypox has been reported in Africa. The risk of spreading to other countries is high, and it is possible that this virus could become a global threat. Based on the information available, it appears that the outbreak constitutes a public health emergency of international concern. countries around the world are urged to take measures to prevent the further spread of the virus and to protect their citizens from exposure.

What is Being Done to Stop the Outbreak?

The WHO is continuing to evaluate the outbreak as a public health emergency of international concern. The organization has issued a global alert and is working with partners to implement control measures. In the United States, state and local health departments are leading response efforts with support from WHO. What are some control measures being taken? WHO is advising members to take the following steps to control the spread of monkeypox: - Immediately isolate people who are sick with monkeypox and monitor them for any respiratory illness; if they develop pneumonia, they should be hospitalized immediately. - thoroughly clean surfaces that have been contaminated with monkeypox droplets or blood; disinfect hands thoroughly after removing gloves and any other gear used in contact with patients or infected materials; and decontaminate all surfaces before leaving an area. - report any cases of monkeypox to health authorities.

About 41,500 Courses of Vaccines are Distributed in the US

Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can cause severe health problems in infected people. There has been an outbreak of monkeypox in the US, and officials are concerned about the potential for it to become a public health emergency. If you are planning to travel to the US, you should be vaccinated against monkeypox. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has distributed courses on vaccines to hospitals and other locations throughout the US. This is to help protect the public from the potential outbreak of monkeypox. If you are not immune to monkeypox, you should take precautions to avoid being infected. You should avoid close contact with people who are sick with monkeypox, and you should stay away from areas where there has been an outbreak of monkeypox. You can also take steps to prevent the spread of monkeypox through coughing and sneezing.

How many People have Contracted the Virus?

There is currently no confirmed estimate for the number of people who have contracted monkeypox, as the outbreak is still ongoing. However, it is suspected that the number of people who have contracted the virus is high, as there have been several reports from around the world. If you think that an international public health emergency may be occurring, WHO recommends that you consider this to be the case. This would mean that resources could be mobilized to address the situation and prevent the further spread of the virus.

WHO Classification of the Outbreak

Monkeypox is a highly contagious viral disease that can be deadly in humans. The World Health Organization (WHO) has determined that the outbreak of monkeypox is a public health emergency of international concern. WHO has thus declared the outbreak a global health emergency. The declaration means that all countries are required to take appropriate measures to prevent the disease from spreading and to provide assistance to those affected. WHO is also requesting financial support from donor countries and the United Nations World Food Programme (UNWFP). WHO has released a statement urging members of the public who may have been exposed to the virus to seek medical attention as soon as possible. The agency is also urging people who live in areas where monkeypox is common to take basic precautions, such as using insect repellent and wearing long-sleeved clothing when outdoors. Since the virus is easily spread through contact with respiratory secretions or blood, WHO is warning healthcare workers and other contacts of people with monkeypox not to travel unless they are necessary. In addition, WHO is advising people who have been in close contact with someone who has Monkeypox not to go to work or school for at least 21 days after their exposure.

What can be Done to Prevent the Outbreak from Spreading?

The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently considering whether the monkeypox outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern. If it is, WHO will be able to take more aggressive measures to prevent its spread, such as sending in reinforcements or funding research into potential vaccines and treatments. Here are four things you can do to help prevent the outbreak from spreading: 1. Stay informed about the situation: The best way to stay informed about the monkeypox outbreak is to check WHO’s website for updates. You can also follow @WHO on Twitter for up-to-date information. 2. Vaccinate yourself and your family members: If you are in a place where the monkeypox virus is circulating, vaccination is your best protection. Make sure to discuss vaccinations with your healthcare provider before getting vaccinated, as some vaccines may not be recommended for people with certain medical conditions. Vaccinations are also available for other members of your household, including pets. 3. Reduce your exposure to monkeys: The most effective way to reduce your exposure to monkeys is to avoid contact with them. If you must have contact with monkeys, wear gloves and a face mask, and wash your hands afterward. 4. Fund research into potential vaccines and treatments: If the outbreak spreads beyond Africa, funding for research into potential vaccines and treatments will be critical. You can support this research by donating to organizations like the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

What is the Health Impact of the Monkeypox Outbreak?

Monkeypox is a highly contagious viral disease that can be deadly in those who are not immune to it. As of now, there have been 174 confirmed monkeypox cases and 16 deaths in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared this monkeypox outbreak an international public health emergency. There is no specific treatment for monkeypox, and it can be deadly if not treated quickly. People who are infected with monkeypox may experience fever, rash, muscle aches, impaired breathing, and pneumonia. If left untreated, monkeypox can lead to death. The health impact of the monkeypox outbreak is significant. Not only are people in the United States affected, but international travel has also put many people at risk from this virus. If you or someone you know is infected with monkeypox, please seek medical attention as soon as possible.

What Should You Do if You are Suspected of Having Monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a highly contagious virus that can be deadly in humans. If you are in the United States, Canada, or any other country where monkeypox is not endemic, and you develop symptoms of monkeypox, please see your doctor. If you are concerned that you may have a monkeypox, please follow the instructions below to help protect yourself and others. If you are a healthcare worker who has come into contact with someone who may have monkeypox, please take the following steps: -Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; be sure to also clean any surfaces you came in contact with during your work -Cover any cuts or abrasions on your skin with a sterile adhesive bandage or wrap -Stay home from work until you have fully recovered from the fever and rash, which typically lasts four to seven days -Avoid close contact with people who are sick and avoid touching anything that may have been contaminated by the person who has monkeypox If you are a monkeypox patient, please follow the instructions below to help protect yourself and others: -Stay home from work, school, and public activities for seven days after your fever and rash have disappeared -Avoid close contact with people who are sick and avoid touching anything that may have been contaminated by the person who has monkeypox -If you have to go out in public, cover your nose and mouth with a cloth mask or a surgical mask to prevent the spread of the disease -If you are a healthcare worker who has come into contact with monkeypox patients, follow the guidelines above for hand washing and covering cuts and abrasions.

What can People do to Reduce their Risk of Exposure to the Monkeypox Outbreak?

There is no specific prevention measure that is foolproof, but following the steps below can help reduce your risk of exposure to the monkeypox outbreak: - avoid close contact with monkeys and their habitats; - avoid touching surfaces that may have been contaminated with monkeypox; - use effective hygiene practices, including hand-washing and wearing protective gear when handling any type of animal or environmental sample; - inform family and friends about the monkeypox outbreak, so they can take appropriate precautions.

Conclusion

As of this writing, the WHO has not yet declared the outbreak of monkeypox an international public health emergency of international concern. However, based on the information and evidence that is currently available, it would be hard to argue against such a declaration being made. For now, all people who are potentially exposed to the virus should take steps to protect themselves and avoid any close contact with monkeys. If you have recently been in contact with a monkey or visited an area where there are numerous monkeys, please speak to your doctor immediately about how best to protect yourself.

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